10/26/2016 11:23:35 PM | Brian Davey DDS

MANY FAMILIES AND FRIENDS gather together on a weekly basis to watch their favorite teams go head to head. And while people come to watch the game, we all know what they’re really there for… the food!

Traditional game day snacks may be delicious–think wings, sliders, nachos, pizza–but they are certainly not the healthiest for our bodies, or our teeth for that matter.

Make Healthier Choices On Game Day

October is one of the busiest sports months of the year. For all you sports fans out there, you’re going to have a lot of games to watch and, as a result, a lot of unhealthy finger food you may be planning to eat. Making healthier choices for the big game is easy… and well worth it!

For more smile-friendly snacks, try these healthy alternatives to traditional game day food:

  • Veggie-filled wraps instead of sliders. Leafy greens contain vitamins essential for healthy teeth and gums.
  • Yogurt instead of ice cream. You know dairy is good for your teeth! But watch out for added sugars you can find in ice cream and some yogurts. Make a greek yogurt parfait or a yogurt-based dip for fruit to protect those chompers.
  • Bruschetta instead of pizza. Fresh-made bruschetta, especially with calcium-rich cheese on top, is a great substitute for greasy pizza.
  • Vegetables instead of chips. Refined, starchy foods can be worse for your teeth than sugar. Bake your own kale chips or substitute cucumbers, celery, and carrots for greasy chips. You’ll get that crunch factor you crave as well as protect your teeth from decay.
  • Zucchini or sweet potato fries instead of french fries. Bake your fries instead of deep-fry them. Sweet potatoes have a lot of vitamin C which promotes healthy gums. Zucchini has an extremely high water content which will get your saliva flowing.

You could even try this healthy spinach and artichoke dip at your next watch-party!

Here’s another fun fact: including apples and strawberries in your snack game plan can actually help whiten your teeth! These fruits contain malic acid which removes surface stains from your teeth and whitens enamel.

In addition, nuts, celery, carrots and again, apples, are great finger foods that work as natural toothbrushes. That’s right! Because of their abrasive texture, they naturally remove bacteria and plaque. They also increase saliva production, helping to wash away food particles and bacteria in your mouth. So the next time you want to just eat the wings and leave the celery, think again.

Eat Right For A Winning Smile

We know you want your team to win the big game, but it’s even more important to have a winning smile! What are your favorite healthy game day snacks? Let us know in the comments below. We’d love to get some more ideas!

Happy watching to all our sports fans!

Thank you for your trust in our practice. We passionate about our patients’ health. It is our goal to get 20,000 people healthier by 2020. We offer FREE consultations to answer your questions. Please call us to schedule (858) 538-8300.

Thank you for reading and for being our valued patients and friends!

Brian Davey, DDS

http://www.drdavey.com

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Top image by Flickr user Abdulla Al Muhairi used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.



1/27/2016 12:44:54 PM | Brian Davey DDS

MANY PARENTS mention how difficult it can be to get their teenagers to practice good oral hygiene. The teenage years are rife with junk food, soda consumption, and in some cases, an indifference to daily brushing and flossing.

Although it may be challenging, motivating teens toward better oral health care is extremely important. For the teenagers of this generation, a parent’s best bet of making oral hygiene more fun may be technology!

Oral Health Tech Can Pique Your Teen’s Interest

Motivate your teenagers to engage in good oral hygiene by showing them these gadgets for their morning and nightly routine!

  • Oral Irrigator: Flossing the old-fashioned way can seem tedious. Using a water flosser is quicker and more fun! Even teenagers seem to love the idea of power washing their teeth.
  • Shower Flosser: A spin on oral irrigation, the shower flosser makes it even more convenient to floss your teeth. Simply attach an oral irrigation unit to your shower head for mess-free flossing!
  • Power Flosser: With a flexible nylon tip that slips easily in between teeth, a power flosser will floss your teeth with up to 10,000 gentle tip strokes per minute. It’s fast and fun!
  • Air Flosser: Another alternative to conventional flossing, the air flosser cleans out debris and plaque by shooting quick bursts of air and water in between teeth.
  • Natural Sweeteners: Many trendy new snacks and candies contain non-sugar sweeteners. Xylitol, for example, is effective in fighting off plaque and cavities. Research shows that xylitol protects teeth from decay by preventing bacteria from sticking to teeth and keeping a neutral pH level in the mouth. Buy your kids some sugar-free, xylitol-sweetened gum or mints and encourage them to use them after eating.

Start Good Habits When They’re Young

Dental decay is the most common chronic disease in young people between the ages of five and 17, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Good oral health habits should be taught early so that when your children do become teenagers, they have already established an oral hygiene routine and have a sound understanding of why it is important.

After all, if they keep up good dental habits, they could end up like this hip grandmawho still has all of her teeth!

Partners In Promoting Oral Health

As your trusted dental professionals, we are your partners in promoting the oral health of your whole family. We’re here to help motivate children and teenagers toward better oral care so that your family can remain happy and healthy!

Thank you for reading our blog and for trusting us with your family’s dental care! It is our goal to get 20,000 people healthier by 2020. We offer FREE consultations to answer your questions. Please call us to schedule (858) 538-8300.

Brian Davey, DDS

http://www.drdavey.com

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Image by Flickr user Teeejayy used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.




1/20/2016 12:37:38 PM | Brian Davey DDS

LET’S JUST SAY IT… bad breath is unpleasant. And yet we’ve all suffered from it. Sometimes, however, it’s worse than others. You may wonder, what causes bad breath? And perhaps more importantly, what is the best way to prevent it?

Bad breath, or halitosis, can be caused by a number of things. Here are some reasons your breath may not be as fresh as you’d like:

Good Oral Hygiene Makes All The Difference

If you don’t brush and floss everyday, food stays in your mouth and collects bacteria. This bacteria causes bad breath. On top of that, food that remains in your mouth and in between your teeth will begin to rot and smell bad.

Brush and floss regularly and go to your biannual dental cleanings (or more, as directed). As bacteria that causes bad breath often congregates on the back of your tongue, make the tongue scraper your best friend!

Certain Foods Make Breath Worse Than Others

Watch out for foods such as garlic, onions, cheese, and soda, as they can be a major cause of unpleasant breath. Once food is absorbed into the bloodstream, it’s transferred to the lungs where it is expelled through your breath. Thus, foods with strong tastes or odors, like the ones mentioned above, can stick around longer than you’d like.

Consumption of tobacco products can also cause severe halitosis. If you use tobacco, ask us for assistance in helping you quit.

Bad Breath Can Be Linked To A Medical Disorder

Our oral health is strongly connected to other health conditions. In fact, bad breath could be the first sign of a medical disorder. Severe and persistent halitosis is a major symptom of dental diseases such as gum disease and cavities. Other maladies can negatively affect our breath as well such as diabetes, sinus infections, and liver or kidney ailments.

What’s Up With Morning Breath?

Morning breath seems to be an especially pungent offender. Morning breath gets to be so bad mainly because of dry mouth. During the day, saliva works to wash away food debris and keep bacteria in check.

When we sleep at night, our saliva production goes down, causing our mouths to become more dry and allowing bacteria to proliferate. Many people sleep with their mouths open as well, which can make dry mouth even worse.

Here’s what you can do to make your morning breath a little less offensive:

  • Clean your teeth before bed. This is a given! The less food bacteria have to munch on, the less odorous your mouth will be in the morning.
  • Keep water by the bed. When you wake up during the night, take a drink of water. Keeping your mouth moist will combat the spread of those smelly bacteria.

We’re Here To Help

For the most part, bad breath is manageable. However, chronic or extreme bad breath is not normal. If you are concerned about halitosis or have any questions, call and make an appointment with us. Our job is to find solutions for a healthier, happier you!

Thank you for your trust in our practice. We love our patients especially the ones with fresh breath. It is our goal to get 20,000 people healthier by 2020. We offer FREE consultations to answer your questions. Please call us to schedule (858) 538-8300.

Thank you for reading and for being our valued patients and friends!

Brian Davey, DDS

http://www.drdavey.com

 

Image by Flickr user fiverlocker used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.




1/13/2016 12:26:45 PM | Brian Davey DDS

DR. DAVEY ISN’T JUST LOOKING FOR CAVITIES at your routine checkup. A quick examination of your mouth can reveal a lot more about your oral and overall health than you think. Dr. Davey and your hygienist may even discover some of your quirky habits!

Here are a few things dentists may notice when they look inside your mouth:

#1: You Haven’t Been Flossing Regularly

That quick flossing session right before your appointment may make it more apparent to your dentist that you haven’t been flossing on a regular basis. When you only floss right before your dental checkup, your gums may still be bleeding and usually look damaged and inflamed. Healthy gums, on the other hand, appear tight and pink.

#2: You Have A Sinus Infection

Sinus infections are known for causing pain and pressure in your sinus cavity, but sometimes you can even feel it in your upper teeth!

Are you unsure whether you have a toothache or a sinus infection? Luckily, your dentist can tell the difference! A simple home test is to bend over and touch your toes. If the pressure or pain increases upon bending over, it is most likely not a toothache!

#3: You Bite Your Nails

Here’s one of those quirky habits that you can’t hide from your dentist! Nail biters have leveled off, flat front teeth. This is because of the grinding that occurs between the top and bottom teeth.

#4: You Have A Vitamin Deficiency

Dentists look at more than just your teeth—they examine the health of your whole mouth! Vitamin deficiencies in particular can manifest themselves in your mouth in various ways. Here are some examples:

  • Sores
  • Changes in the tongue
  • Tissue sloughing off
  • Delayed healing
  • Easily bleeding gums
  • Burning tongue syndrome

Dentists are often the first to discover a vitamin deficiency and can help get you back on track.

#5: You Used To Suck Your Thumb

If you had the habit of sucking your thumb or finger past the age of seven, there will be significant changes in your bite and the position of your teeth. Telltale signs may remain but these can be fixed through orthodontic treatment.

#6: You Have Another Serious Health Issue

Serious maladies such as oral cancer, diabetes, and heart disease show symptoms in the mouth.

Oral cancer, for example, is characterized by unexplained bleeding, discolored patches, swelling, bumps, or even eroded areas on the lips, gums, or other areas inside the mouth. Diabetes and heart disease visibly affect the health of the gums, shown by increased swelling, bleeding and sensitivity.

We Provide More Than Just A Cleaning

Your dental appointment is much more than just a cleaning! That is why our office calls your appointment a Wellness Visit. Beyond being able to tell that you bite your nails or don’t floss as often as you should, we can also detect other, more serious health problems and help you get your health back on track.

Your overall health is important to us. Trust us to catch any warning signs that may appear in your mouth. We’re here to detect any problems and help you stay healthy and happy!

Thank you for your trust in our practice. We love our patients and we love seeing you smile. It is our goal to get 20,000 people healthier by 2020. We offer FREE consultations to answer your questions. Please call us to schedule (858) 538-8300.

Thank you for reading and for being our valued patients and friends!

Brian Davey, DDS

http://www.drdavey.com

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Image by Flickr user Tobias Scheck used underCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.




11/2/2015 6:57:00 PM | Brian Davey DDS

6c054baa-fee3-4880-9432-591c13381611

AGING BRINGS CHANGES. Some of those changes we love, and some drive us crazy. But every change is better when you have a caring professional on your side.

Many believe that lost teeth are inevitable with the progressing years. That’s simply not true! With proper care, your teeth can last a lifetime. And with modern techniques and technology, you can be proud of your smile for just as long.

We’ll Help You Care For Your Aging Smile

Every patient, and especially those over age 50, need to care for their gums! Gum disease, not tooth decay, is the number one cause of missing teeth in adults. As we age, our resistance to infection (including infections that cause gum disease) lowers.

However, daily brushing and flossing, together with close care from our team, will keep your teeth and gums healthy. Some patients may need more frequent cleanings, special tools, or specific procedures like root planing and scaling, in order to maintain or restore gum health.

Understand The True Value Of Your Smile

As we age, we understand the wisdom in taking good care of ourselves. Not just for our own sake, but for our loved ones, as well.

Your smile is integral to your health and happiness. Social interactions, the way we talk and eat, and the way we feel about ourselves are all affected by the state of our smile. A beautiful, cared-for smile is key for looking and feeling healthy as we age.

One more wonderful thing often comes with age: the time and ability to pursue our own interests and passions. Take this opportunity to invest in your smile, and enjoy the positive effect that it will have in all aspects of your life!

It’s Never Too Late For A Beautiful Smile

If you believe that you’ve missed your chance for a beautiful smile, take another look! Recent developments make the dentures of 10 years ago look like ancient history. Even small procedures can subtract years, and add to your health and confidence.

Thanks for your trust in our practice. We love our patients and we love seeing you smile. Let us know what we can do to protect, preserve, and restore your smile. We offer FREE consultations to answer your questions and explore options. Please call us to schedule (858) 538-8300.

Thank you for reading and for being our valued patients and friends!

Brian Davey, DDS

http://www.drdavey.com

Image by Flickr user Christopher Michel used underCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.




10/28/2015 6:45:00 PM | Brian Davey DDS

cc404685-d9ef-4830-a329-8e2ef50cc168

WE ALL KNOW it’s possible to catch a cold from someone who’s under the weather. Did you know cavity-causing bacteria can be passed from person-to-person too?

Bacteria Is At The Root Of Cavities

While sugary treats often take the blame for causing cavities, the real culprits for tooth decay are bacteria. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are bacteria which stick to our teeth and eat food particles left behind from our last meal, producing acids which threaten gum health and cause tooth decay.

And just like cold-causing bacteria, these bacteria like to travel.

Bacteria Travels From Person-to-Person

Whether it’s through sharing a drink or kissing a loved one, cavity-causing bacteria can be passed from person-to-person the same way many other bacterial infections can. Studies have shown that “catching a cavity” is not only possible, it happens far more often than you might think.

One of the most common transmissions is from parent and child. Cavity-causing bacteria is commonly passed along to a child when a mother or father tastes food to ensure it’s not too hot or when he or she “cleans” a pacifier by sucking on it before handing it over.

Take Simple Steps To Stop The Spread of Bacteria

What can you do to reduce your risk of transmitting these cavity-causing bacteria to someone else?

  • Floss and brush frequently.
  • Chew sugar-free gum—this promotes saliva production and washes away plaque and bacteria).
  • Be mindful of drinks and eating utensils you’re sharing and the risks that are involved.
  • Be aware of other behaviors which may spread these bacteria.

Trust Our Practice For Solutions

Nobody wants to inadvertently “catch a cavity.” Our practice is committed to providing you with the best information possible to help you create a healthy and resilient smile. If you have any questions about this, be sure to ask us! We love visiting about your oral health. You can also comment below and reach out to us on social media.

Thank you for reading our blog! We value our relationship with you as our patients and friends!

Sincerely,

Brian Davey, DDS

Image by Flickr user bigbirdz used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.




10/26/2015 6:41:14 PM | Brian Davey DDS

7e41855b-0960-410a-9f26-7c10b72ec6b6
MANY OF OUR PATIENTS HAVE GONE OFF TO COLLEGE!
Parents be aware that this can drastically throw off a young adult’s normal at-home routine. Brushing and flossing, making healthy eating choices, and keeping up with routine appointments can become difficult for college students.

Late Night College Life Can Be Hard On A Smile

One of the biggest lifestyle changes for college students is the surge in late-night study sessions and all-nighters. To stay awake, many students consume large amounts of coffee, energy drinks, or soda. These can be super bad for teeth. Drinking plenty of water is one way to help reduce the risk of cavities and tooth decay caused by the increase in acidic and sugary drinks.

At the end of these long stretches of caffeinated studying, it is important that students brush, floss and rinse before going to bed or starting the new day.

Snacking is also common during late-night study sessions which can be detrimental to oral health. If snacks are consumed, choose healthy ones. It’s better to snack on things like dairy products, fresh produce and nuts than candy, dried fruit and other sticky, sugary foods.

Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth come in during our late teens and early twenties. Our evaluation of patients’ wisdom teeth growth and placement can be very important for college students. Together we can determine whether or not they need to be removed and can prevent pain and discomfort that could potentially interrupt studies.

New Year, New Habits

With a new school schedule and a new lifestyle, students should be aware of new habits they’re creating. How has sugar intake changed? Is brushing and flossing routine? Are regularly scheduled hygiene appointments being kept?

During college, normal routines are disrupted, so if you’re a college student (or if you know one to remind) be sure to keep up with regular exams and cleanings. Dr. Davey want to help you keeping your smile happy and healthy so you can focus on what’s important–your studies!

Thank you for being part of our practice family!

Be sure to CALL US TODAY to schedule appointments for your college kids during their break. We want to catch up with them about their new adventures and take care of their smiles. 858-538-8300

Sincerely,

Dr. Davey and Team

Image by Flickr user CollegeDegrees360 used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.



9/25/2015 7:15:45 AM | Brian Davey DDS

6d2fd42d-dcc8-4b64-af03-10f5293f31ba

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN LAID BACK in our dental chair wondering what the numbers mean that Tracey, Seanna, or Anna calls out while examining your gums? They’re readings of the gum pocket depths in your mouth, and they’re an important part of monitoring your gum health.

Pocket Readings Help Us Measure Inflammation

Pocket depth refers to your gums’ attachment to your teeth. If there’s an infection in your gums, they can become inflamed. The gums slightly pull away from teeth, making that pocket between your teeth and gums deeper. The deeper the pockets, the higher the risk of gum disease.

We use a labeled probe to see how deep the pockets go. 1–3 millimeters is a good reading. Any higher than that, and you may be in the danger zone!

Inflammation Leads To Gum Disease

Bacteria harbors in those deep pockets, and can cause more inflammation and detachment, so it’s important to counteract the first signs of encroaching gum disease right away. The early stages of gum disease (gingivitis) are reversible, with refocused care for your teeth and gums.

However, if the infection has progressed to periodontitis, it becomes a more complex condition to care for, requiring constant vigilance and possibly, more intensive treatments.

Take Your Periodontal Health Seriously

Periodontal disease is the most common cause of lost teeth in adults. Possibly 80% of adults have some level of gum disease. It’s something everyone needs to take seriously.

You can take responsibility for your own dental health. Talk to us about your gum pocket readings. You can even ask to have a mirror and watch as we measure. Ask us what you can do to reduce your risk. And if you have gum disease, take action to get control of the infection right away!

Proper Flossing Is One Of The Greatest Prevention Habits

Regular wellness visits with our team can help to fight gum disease, especially when paired with your vigilant at-home care, including daily flossing. If you ever have any questions about your oral health, please ask us!

Thanks for your trust in our practice! Now go floss!

Brian Davey, DDS

7805 Highlands Village Pl. Suite G105 • San Diego, CA 92129

Call our office to discuss any dental needs you may have. We are always accepting patients who value their health.

(Image by Flickr user Rory MacLeod used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.)




9/23/2015 4:05:10 AM | Brian Davey DDS

2755a15b-805b-4b49-9235-f71a0443fb76

PROTECTION DURING sports and other extreme activities can potentially save your teeth and gums from serious, or permanent damage.

Cheap over-the-counter “boil and bite” mouthguards may seem appealing because of the low price tag and convenience, but without the correct protective properties, cheap mouthguards could cost an athlete more in the long run.

Not All Mouthguards Give Equal Protection

Contrary to custom-fitted athletic mouthguards, over-the-counter options are often uncomfortable to wear and do not provide the proper amount of protection to the teeth and mouth. On the other hand, custom mouthguards are far more comfortable because they are made to fit your mouth specifically.

Other benefits of custom mouthguards include:

  • they simply last longer
  • easy breathing and improved speech for maximum endurance and clear communication
  • a secure fit that stays in place during impact
  • professionally sized to any mouth size
  • resistant to irritation of sensitive gums
  • reduced risk and severity of dental injuries
  • rated for the highest level of protection
  • minimal discomfort and inconvenience when worn

Mouth Protection Is An Investment

Although personalized athletic mouthguards have a higher cost than over-the-counter options, they can potentially save you from serious expenses from injuries sustained from insufficient protection.

We Want To Help Protect Your Smile

Investing in a custom mouthguard can make all of the difference for you and your family’s oral health. While participating in sports and other activities is fun, it’s important that you protect your beautiful smile while doing so! Let’s talk about your unique and individual oral safety needs. If you or someone you know are in need of a custom mouthguard or have questions about custom mouthguards, please contact us.

Thank you for being our valued patient and friend!

Brian Davey, DDS

Image by Flickr user Torrey Wiley used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.